Lately there have been some rumblings about how well-run (or not) the Red Cross is. Hotair ran a good piece on the subject last year which brought up some concerns about how the Red Cross does business. Make no mistake about it either, they are a business. It seems that this iconic organization isn’t really that well-organized and wastes a lot of resources every year due to inefficiency. While the organizational structure of a large company like the Red Cross is outside the scope of this blog, it does bring up a few important points that are worth remembering. Nobody and no organization should ever be beyond question. Accountability, especially for organizations like the Red Cross, is often overlooked because they ostensibly do good. This should not be the case, any company, government, school, non-profit, or other organization must be able to stand up to independent scrutiny. The other point is that instead of looking for large monoliths to come in and save the day, why not focus on local organizations and neighborhoods as the primary sources of disaster relief? That may be something to keep in mind the next time somebody asks for a donation…

Over the last few years, the tactical tomahawk has become more visible both in stores and within the prepper community. Part of the reason for this is it can perform several functions yet not take up a lot of space. Think of it as a axe version of a multi-tool, akin to what the e-tool is to shovels. Anyway, there was a good article on tomahawks over at Gizmodo that is worth a read. It gives a good overview of why they are so useful and what features to look for before purchasing one. I am in the market for one myself so I am going to heed my own advice and keep this information in mind before purchasing my tomahawk.

A while back a friend of mine wrote a thought-provoking article on playing the odds. The essence of the article is that most people don’t think twice about preventing residential fires, but the debate changes entirely when it comes to firearms ownership. There is no stigma attached with buying fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, and emergency lights to deal with fires. Nor should there be, after all household fires still happen regularly.

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The other day, I mentioned how probability is important in making and prioritizing preparation activities. Today, I’m going to discuss one event that has about a 3% probability of happening to you if you live in the United States. Its something you need to be prepared for because it can happen right in front of you, or to you, anytime you get behind the wheel.

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